Homeward Bound

The final day dawned with clouds spilling over the top of the mountains and a chill wind pushing down the canyon. 20181002_072522_Burst01 (1)

With sore knees and a reluctant heart, I broke camp to try to make it home before the reported storm settled in. I took the more scenic route, traveling south on Horseshoe Meadows Road for a few miles before turning east down Lubken Canyon Road. Scrub brush stretched for miles across the alluvial fan and it felt like I was alone on the planet until I spotted a large dog on the side of the road. I slowed and he began chasing the car and barking excitedly. Then I spotted his companion, another good sized golden retriever type. I couldn’t help but think of my dogs that someone had dumped on the side of the road two years ago. I stopped the car and got out, not sure of what to do. Could I just leave them out there in the middle of nowhere? They both appeared friendly, though the one kept barking something about Timmy having fallen down the well. Just when I had decided that I would have to turn back to the last human habitation I’d seen to report their whereabouts, a jovial looking man, wearing shorts, and carrying a long stick popped out of the bushes across the road. He launched into an explanation of how he took his wife, who had Parkinson’s, out for a walk every morning, and all I could do was gush about how relieved I was to see him. We each thought the other a bit odd, I’m sure.

I thought that Lubken Canyon Road connected with Highway 395 but as it grew narrower and more deteriorated, I began to worry that it would dead end with no place wide enough to turn around with a trailer. The road was hemmed in on both sides by weedy ditches and a fence. Then I came to a sign saying, “road narrows”.  Oh, crap! Now it was one lane wide with no room to meet an oncoming vehicle, much less turn around. Backing in a straight line with a trailer is not my strong suit so I continued down the track, praying I didn’t meet anyone coming up.20181002_100658 (1)

As luck would have it, I had this lovely lane to myself. Ahead it looked as if the road either ended or turned and then voila! It turned over a cattle guard and immediately became a perfectly paved, two-lane road heading directly east. My little adventure had been mostly in my head but sometimes one has to find thrills where one can.

 

4 thoughts on “Homeward Bound

  1. Beautiful country! I’m relieved that the dogs were not abandoned and that you were able to leave them with a clear conscience. I am a big chicken when it comes to mountain roads or the prospect of backing up with or without a trailer. I’m still waiting for Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang to become a reality!

    Like

    1. Oh, my Dog! We’re dating ourselves by even admitting we know about that movie. I’m a chicken too when it comes to real danger but the optimist in me can never see that the worst could possibly happen…and so far it hasn’t.

      Like

  2. I believe I missed one or two posts . It is not frequent, Judy, you are exploring those places, wonderful but where it is the reign of the solitude . Was it prudent ? . And you cross this mountain by car ! This is new! 🙂
    But this being said I envy you . The first photo says well the wonderful landscape you crossed . It is surprising there was not any flocks of sheeps or cows . But it was better for you and your car in that narrow road ! Perhaps you would have carried to your home a cow or a sheep or ths two dogs into your trailer ! 🙂
    Love ❤
    Michel

    Like

    1. There actually was a herd of cows on the left side and a few horses on the right side of the road but, remembering that cattle rustling is still a capital offense in some parts of this country, I resisted the urge to take one home.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s